Contact Kestrel Wind Turbines
Click here for information outside South Africa |
View our channel on LinkedIn Follow us on YouTube Follow Kestrel Wind on Twitter Follow Kestrel Wind on Facebook Get an RSS feed of the latest news from Kestrel Wind Turbines.
  • Eveready Group

Home Energy System in South Africa

Kestrel e300 as a household energy generating tool Kestrel e300 as a household energy generating tool The system diagram for the Home Energy System The system diagram for the Home Energy System NMBM Pilot Project with Kestrel Creator James Carpy (right) and National Sales Manager, Stuart Daniels NMBM Pilot Project with Kestrel Creator James Carpy (right) and National Sales Manager, Stuart Daniels Kestrel is unassuming in the landscape with low noise emissions Kestrel is unassuming in the landscape with low noise emissions

OVERVIEW

As part of it’s vision to promote the generation and use of renewable energy, the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality alongside with the Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University is currently investigating the feasibility of implementing "small scale decentralized grid connected renewable energies" in the Municipality, and furthermore in South Africa.

Small scale, because the systems used are sized for household needs. Decentralized, because the energy production is scattered amongst various households, instead of having only one large plant. Grid-connected, so that the household can exchange electricity with the grid. Renewable energies, because the electricity is produced from renewable sources (wind, sun, water, waves etc)

A typical domestic dwelling has been selected for the purpose, and a complete hybrid system comprising of solar panels, a wind turbine, battery storage and the necessary monitoring and control equipment has been installed.

Kestrel and the NMBM will also be promoting renewable energy sources and giving public exposure to the project, by installing a wind turbine on Hobie Beach’s pier (on the top of the ready existing mast). The electricity produced will be used to power a set of lights at the end of the pier.  

ADVANTAGES

- Worldwide environmental considerations. The use of renewable energies contributes to slow down the process of global warming and emission of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.
- Fossil fuel shortage. We are already experiencing the up rise of costs for traditional energy sources in electricity production, sooner or later these sources will no longer be economically viable and alternative solutions will have to be considered.
- Alleviate households from grid dependence. By producing their own electricity, households are no longer impacted by load shedding or tariff rise.

THE SYSTEM

The electricity produced from the renewable sources (here solar panels and a wind turbine) is converted in a 220V/50Hz sinewave by the grid manager/inverter (yellow on the scheme) so that it can be used as the regular supply. The excess energy produced (not consumed by the household) can be "fed" into the grid through a special feed-in meter.
The batteries can be used for backup purposes when the grid is down: they can be charged at day time by the renewable sources, and provide energy at night time.

Installed by: Telecom Techniques, Port Elizabeth click here

OVERSEAS EXAMPLE

Renewable tariffs for decentralized sources have proven the most successful mechanism for stimulating investment in renewable electricity generation worldwide. Such systems have already been implemented to a large extend in various countries overseas. Way ahead of the other European countries, Germany set up the first feed-in bylaws for decentralized grid-connection in 1990. Nowadays in Germany, over 250.000 homes, businesses and farms have installed PV panels on their roofs, producing around 3900 MW (Mega Watts) of solar energy (7 times the needs for the whole Nelson Mandela Bay metropolis), while 20.000 wind turbines throughout the country operate over 25.000 MW (50 times NMBM needs!).

Today, renewables (mainly set up under feed-in laws) in Germany provide over 10% of supply (55 TWh/yr = 55.000.000 kWh/yr) and overall 150.000 jobs in renewable energy.

Some places have gone as far as Prince Edward’s Island (a province of Canada), which recently annouced the implementation of renewable policy including feed-in tariffs for the island to generate 100% of its electricity from renewables by 2015.

THE FUTURE

If successful, this project will hopefully lead to national laws and regulations to allow people to connect renewable sources of energy (e.g. wind turbines, solar panels…) to the public utility, and sell the excess energy produced (electricity which isn’t consumed by the household) at a so-called “green feed-in tariff” or "renewable tariff".
The scope of this green tariff is to make renewable energies affordable for everyone. Indeed, by selling back the energy into the grid at a higher price than that for consumption (currently R 0.63 per
kWh and R 1.35 in France ), after a certain period of time the overall income generated by the electricity production is sufficient to cover the initial costs of the systems. This period of time is called “break-even” period. It varies accordingly to many factors, mainly: the feed-in tariff, the amount of energy harvested per year, the type of systems used and the initial cost of the systems.


Following, a rough illustration of the mechanisms of feed-in tariffs for a 2kW solar PV system in France and a 3kW wind turbine system in South Africa (with an expected feed-in tariff of 5.5 R/kWh - being a European standard linked to the EURO):

With NO feed-in tariff:

Type of systems

2kW PV

3kW Wind

 

France

SA

Initial cost (R)

160 000

105 000

Annual energy harvest (kWh)

2 000

5 500

Annual cost saving (R)

2 700

3 465

Feed-in tariff (R/kWh)

0

0

Break-even time (years)

59

30

With feed-in tariff:

Type of systems

2kW PV

3kW Wind

Initial cost (R)

160 000 

105 000 

Annual energy harvest (kWh) 

2 000 

5 500

Annual cost saving (R) 

2 700

3 465

Annual income (R)

11000

30 250

Feed-in tariff (R/kWh)

5.5

5.5

Break-even time (years)

11

3.5 

From this very simplified simulation of feed-in tariffs, it is possible to see the effect of the various factors on the break-even period. As shown above with France, a high feed-in tariff (around R 5.5 per kWh produced from building-integrated PV source) encourages people to invest in such forms of energy, since they are assured of breaking even after around 11 years. The tariff has reduced the pay back period by 48 years. 
As PV panels have a life expectancy of 25 years, one can understand the popularity of such systems overseas.

If South Africa were to give citizens access to this renewable energy feed-in tariff there would be large benefits. The wind turbine pay back period is reduced significantly from 30 to 3 and a half years. Beyond that, the wind turbine would generate a carbon free income for its owner.

More information about Renewable Energy policy mechanisms .

MORE INFORMATION
Downloads:
IREC’s guide to distributed generation interconnexion issues
Renewable Energy policy mechanisms
White Paper on Renewable Energy
SABC report on this project

Eveready (Pty) LtdEcocellEveready BatteriesHouse Of YorkEveready Lighting

Distribute our product
Kestrel Wind Turbines renewable energy